35th Wffc Bih 2015

World Fly Fishing Championship 2019

Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration (WSFR) Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout

Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration (WSFR) Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout


♪Music The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service’s Wildlife and Sport
Fish Restoration Program or
WSFR provides a reliable funding source for
state fish and game agencies to
get their work done. Manufacturers and importers of
of hunting and fishing gear pay
an excise tax to the federal
government. That tax is passed on to
hunters and anglers in the price paid for hunting
and fishing gear at the cash
register. That tax, held in trust by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service’s WSFR Program, is given to state agencies
such as the New Mexico
Department of Game and
Fish. The money must be used
on projects that benefit
fish and wildlife, boating access or research
and education. This partnership between the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and state game and fish
agencies has provided beneficial
conservation since 1937. The work of the New
Mexico Department of
Game and Fish on Rio Grande cuthroat trout stands as an example of the WSFR program in action. The Rio Grande cuthroat trout, New Mexico’s official state fish lives in wild and beautiful
places and New Mexico
Department of Game
and Fish biologists are at the vanguard
conserving this native
fish that is important to the
economy and ecology and the citizenry. Well the Rio Grande Cutthroat
trout is the state fish of New Mexico. It’s native to northern New
Mexico and southern Colorado. it’s a very beautiful fish and it’s a fish the anglers
like to catch in the high
mountain streams. Rio Grande cutthroat trout
populations suffered significant challenges
over decades and has become a conservation
priority for the New Mexico Department
of Game and Fish The fish was reduced to about
eleven percent of it’s historic
range so it was on a negative trend
for 50 or 60 years and over the last, I’d say, 20 years
or so we’ve really seen a bump
up in the distribution of
cutthroat trout. I work with the hatchery here at Seven Springs Hatchery, New
Mexico Department Game and Fish
Hatchery very closely, especially in the
Spring, every, uh, Spring we bring new genetic material,
we bring new eggs from the wild way out in the mountains and bring those eggs back to the
hatchery where they can raise
them up and uh, the other way I interact
with the hatchery is when we do restoration projects and we need new new fish to
start a new population of
cutthroat trout we come to the hatchery here
and, uh, we get small fishes to start stocking
these new streams so they can have new populations
of Rio Cutthroat trout on the
landscape. The source of the funding for
the projects that I work on come and for
the hatchery come from sport fish restoration funding which is derived from an excise
tax on fishing equipment and additional funding comes
from the New Mexico Department
of Game and Fish from sales of fishing licenses so really the projects I work on
for the conservation of native
Cutthroat trout are entirely funded by sport fish angler dollars. Seven Springs Hatchery
opererated by the New Mexico Department
of Game and Fish was renovated in 2001 with
funding from the WSFR program, which continues to fund it’s
operation and maintenance. which continues to fund it’s
operation and maintenance. The hatchery is devoted to Rio
Grande cutthroat trout, raising four strains of the fish which are stocked in cold
mountain streams where habitats have been
renovated. So the work that’s been done on
the ground here by New Mexico Department of
Game and Fish through both the work that I do
out in the field and at Seven
Springs Hatchery the funding that comes from
sport fish restoration funding and from license sales uh, it’s been a major in factor
in the preventing the listing of Rio Grande Cutthroat trout
under the Endangered Species
Act. The Rio Costilla project in
nothern New Mexico has been a major success in
cutthroat trout conservation. Strong partnerships and Sport
Fish Restoration funding fuel that success. The conservation work for Rio
Grande cuthroat trout has been
very successful the recent decision for these
species to not be listed under
the Endangered Species Act has really the proof that what
we’ve been doing is really been
effective and we’re having an upward trend
in the species we’re getting it on the
landscape and more anglers are having that
opportunity to get out there and walk in some beautiful country
in New Mexico and have their
shot at catching a really unique
fish The opportunities for angling
that we try to cultivate for the
projects that I work on and other folks in the
New Mexico Department of
Game and Fish those directly benefit anglers
because they can go out and they can fish for these
very unique and strikingly beautiful fish uh, in several places across
New Mexico, if they’re willing to walk just a few feet or they wanna hike eight
miles up into the wilderness, there’s opportunites for anglers
to catch this very special fish. Since first enacted into law by
Congress in 1937, The WSFR programs have sent over
18.6 billion dollars to state agencies to conserve
fish and wildlife. Hunters and anglers foot the
bill but everyone reaps the benefits
of conservation.

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